Non Sports Forums > When Pigs Fly

List all the planes you've flown in the left seat

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GusMcRae:
I think it would be interesting to see what folks have flown, starting with their trainer, as well as what's on your radar screen in the near future.  My CFI has access to several planes that I got to fly with him in the right seat.  Test flew a few others.   I'll start:

1974 Cessna 150 - ragged out trainer owned by my CFI
1973 Cessna 150L - clean little trainer we bought (in Perryville, Arkansas) for several family members to train in.  Got most of my duel xc on the trip home. Finished out training and did check ride in this one.
1981 Cessna 210 - owned by the company my CFI flies commercial for (main plane he flies for them is a Cessna Conquest).  First retract gear and constant speed prop plane I ever flew.
1967 Navion Rangemaster - owned by a friend, was offered a partial interest in, but declined, too much money for antique equipment and bad interior. 
1980 Cessna 172 - CFI owns this one also
Early 60's 172 - don't remember the year model but it had manual flaps and a 180 hp conversion.
Late 50's 182 - manual flaps also, straight tail and narrower fuselage
Early 60's Mooney M20A - another friend owned and let me fly it with him in the right seat when I was considering buying a Mooney.  Manual gear.
Late 60's Piper Cherokee 180 - Just a guy wanting me to consider buying it, CFI flew in the right seat
1967 Cessna 182K - Purchased in December 2011 and have only flown our C-150 a time or two since.

Out of all of the above, I was most intrigued with the Navion, but it is a gas guzzler, it needs a major avionics upgrade as well as a new interior.
Almost flew a Bellanca Super Viking that is for sale at my home base airport, I was considering it, but just couldn't get used to the idea of owning a fiber plane.
I don't have any time in a tail dragger but have plans to soon fly a Cessna 140 to get my taildragger endorsement in.
No twin time, nor have I been signed off to fly a retract gear plane yet. 
Currently having a blast building time in the 182.  Studying for Instrument ticket and have a few hours towards that.

gotyacovered:
152
172
182

the 152/172 was when i was 15 years old. that was when i was stupid enough to choose golf over flying ;D

bvillepig:
Cessna 172  20 hours
Cessna 182   4 hours
Piper Archer III  350 hours
Piper Saratoga  1250 hours
Navajo PA31   3 hours
Cirrus SR22   2 hours
Cessna Corvalis   30 minutes
Cessna 340 30 minutes

I have a couple hours in a Cirrus SR22 and it is a vey nice ride.  I flew the Corvalis a couple years ago on a short 15 minute flight and then back with an instructor on a demo. I would have liked to have taken it above 15000 to see what it could really do. It was a rocket for a piston fixed gear down low.

bvillepig:

--- Quote from: gotyacovered on February 28, 2012, 11:45:32 am ---the 152/172 was when i was 15 years old. that was when i was stupid enough to choose golf over flying ;D


--- End quote ---
Don't be so hard on yourself. I could write a book on the stupid stuff I did while putting off flying.   I could't let the wife read it but she still reminds from time to time .

fdx flyer:
Let's see:

Navy:
T-34C
T-44 (Kingair C90)
T-2C
E-2C
T-45C

Airlines:
737 (type rated, but simulator only, never flown actual airplane)
CRJ (copilot only)
727 (flight engineer and copilot)
Airbus A300 and A310 (copilot only)
777 (full captain's type rating, but operating as copilot)

For fun:
Piper J3 Cub
Piper PA20 Pacer
Piper PA15 Vagabond
Piper Seminole
Piper Comanche
Ryan Navion
Aeronca Champ
Aeronca Chief
Taylorcraft BC12D
Maule M5-210C (owned)
Beechcraft N35 Bonanza (current owner)

I'm sure there's more, but that's plenty.  Oddly enough, I have very little Cessna time.  One intro lesson as a 16 year old in a 150.  One flight in the left seat of a neighbor's 172. And I've never flown a 182.

dc10x1103:
falcon20   falcon50  727   dc10  md11

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: dc10x1103 on February 29, 2012, 08:24:09 am ---falcon20   falcon50  727   dc10  md11

--- End quote ---

what did you train in?

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: fdx flyer on February 29, 2012, 12:56:50 am ---Let's see:

Navy:
T-34C
T-44 (Kingair C90)
T-2C
E-2C
T-45C

Airlines:
737 (type rated, but simulator only, never flown actual airplane)
CRJ (copilot only)
727 (flight engineer and copilot)
Airbus A300 and A310 (copilot only)
777 (full captain's type rating, but operating as copilot)

For fun:
Piper J3 Cub
Piper PA20 Pacer
Piper PA15 Vagabond
Piper Seminole
Piper Comanche
Ryan Navion
Aeronca Champ
Aeronca Chief
Taylorcraft BC12D
Maule M5-210C (owned)
Beechcraft N35 Bonanza (current owner)

I'm sure there's more, but that's plenty.  Oddly enough, I have very little Cessna time.  One intro lesson as a 16 year old in a 150.  One flight in the left seat of a neighbor's 172. And I've never flown a 182.



--- End quote ---

what a good list.

dc10x1103:

--- Quote from: gotyacovered on February 29, 2012, 08:41:36 am ---what did you train in?

--- End quote ---
started in a t-41 (cessna 172) in the army  flew mohawks (ov-1) in vietnam   flew for fedex 1972-2000

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: dc10x1103 on February 29, 2012, 01:50:16 pm ---started in a t-41 (cessna 172) in the army  flew mohawks (ov-1) in vietnam   flew for fedex 1972-2000

--- End quote ---

sweet!

GusMcRae:
Weather was absolutely gorgeous here yesterday.  Wind was only about 5 kts.  Flew the C-150 for about 2 hours late in the day.  It seems that flying a C-182 for the past 40 hours of flying time have really made flying the C-150 seem quite simple.  Everything is so much lighter, so little resistance on all of the controls, but even so, the landing just seemed like "nothing to it". 

I assume that flying a C-182 to some would seem like child's play after flying a bigger ship for awhile.... 

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: GusMcRae on March 01, 2012, 02:57:34 pm ---Weather was absolutely gorgeous here yesterday.  Wind was only about 5 kts.  Flew the C-150 for about 2 hours late in the day.  It seems that flying a C-182 for the past 40 hours of flying time have really made flying the C-150 seem quite simple.  Everything is so much lighter, so little resistance on all of the controls, but even so, the landing just seemed like "nothing to it". 

I assume that flying a C-182 to some would seem like child's play after flying a bigger ship for awhile.... 

--- End quote ---

i know the baron and 414 i have flown (right seat) were totally different in the air. baron=sports car feel/414=huge suv feel

the baron was fun, light on the controls.

also - the tail on that 414 is huge and the wind really pushes it around.

hogpilot:
C150
C172
C182
C206
C210
C340
BE58
BE9L
PAY2 (Cheyenne IIXL)
PAY3 (Cheyenne III)
DC-3T (turbine DC3)

Currently DHC6 for the US Forest Service as a smokejumper pilot.

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: hogpilot on April 12, 2012, 12:43:43 pm ---C150
C172
C182
C206
C210
C340
BE58
BE9L
PAY2 (Cheyenne IIXL)
PAY3 (Cheyenne III)
DC-3T (turbine DC3)

Currently DHC6 for the US Forest Service as a smokejumper pilot.


--- End quote ---

bet you had a busy summer!

hogpilot:
Actually last year wasn't to bad... in Missoula, MT currently getting requalified.

gotyacovered:

--- Quote from: hogpilot on April 12, 2012, 01:55:09 pm ---Actually last year wasn't to bad... in Missoula, MT currently getting requalified.

--- End quote ---

where were you based? in arkansas and texas it seemed to be a record breaking year as far as fires go!

i flew into Vivian (3F4) a couple times building time and there was a huge fire in Texas, they had a TFR for a long time, like 2-3 weeks and i assumed it was b/c they were dropping water and such.

GusMcRae:

--- Quote from: hogpilot on April 12, 2012, 01:55:09 pm ---Actually last year wasn't to bad... in Missoula, MT currently getting requalified.

--- End quote ---

My dad, the one that soloed last month at 78 years young, went to Missoula during one of his summers while at TAMU, and went through smoke jumping school.  He got to jump out on several fires.  Said he went up in an airplane 3 times before he got to land in an airplane,,, first two times he jumped out.  This would have  been in the mid 50's.  The summer prior to that he hitch-hiked to Montana, from North Texas, and was in a lookout tower that summer.  He was a "Range and Forestry" major at TAMU, and I think the department helped them find jobs like that. 

hogpilot:
I'm based out of McCall, ID during the fire season (May-Sept) during the winter months we are based in Ogden, UT...

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