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  • #151 by Root66 on 21 Nov 2010
  • I humbly disagree.  I heard plenty of cowbell on the FG attempts and several other times as well.

    I humbly agree with Rocky.
  • #152 by Root66 on 21 Nov 2010
  • Vevuzela's should be illegal to possess, much less be utilized at sporting events.

    What is a Vevuzela?
  • #153 by 1highhog on 21 Nov 2010
  • Give credit where credit is due.  99% of the Miss St fans used their cow bells appropriately.  Few used them during the opponents (Razorbacks) possessions.  It's a great tradition for them, they were responsibly used and their tradition should continue.  It's another reason why the SEC is a great conference to be!

    If you listened on the Radio they were used quite a bit when Arkansas was on Offense, especially on key 3rd down plays.  Also, even though I cannot remember his name, but the Reporter for the Hogs that posts on here some, but also works for KARK out of Little Rock, almost got hit in the head by one right after the game when a Miss State fan threw their's at him.  They need to be banned and banned now.  You can't throw a Hog Call at someone.
  • #154 by gregsauls on 21 Nov 2010
  • The origin of the cowbell traces back to the early days of MSU football in which the men had no other means of locating their wives after the game. ;D ;)

    Milk on keyboard... again!
  • #155 by MM-gohogs on 21 Nov 2010
  • What is a Vevuzela?

    a **** vuvuzela is the horn used during the 2010 world cup
  • #156 by HOGPICKER on 21 Nov 2010
  • Ya think vuvu's would get thru the gate at WMS?  If no one is going to enforce the noise maker rule, I want to take a few.  Thousand.  Found a bulk order site in Germany.
  • #157 by pigzwillrise on 21 Nov 2010
  • how much money did they have to pay for that rule to created? 
  • #158 by bugo on 21 Nov 2010
  • Cowbells...what a stupid tradition!
  • #159 by Pignutx32 on 21 Nov 2010
  • They are illegal....period!  For those of you who think it doesn't matter, think of it this way.  If we lose on Hocker's field goal miss and he states in the press conference that the bells were so loud and it threw him off, do they bother you then?  If we burn up all of our TO's early and Mallett gets several delay of game penalties because they can't hear his audibles, does it bother you then?

    I had one msu fan tell me that we had the advantage of 3(?) stadiums, walmart/tyson/jerry jones money, and a whole state to ourselves to recruit from and so the cowbells shouldn't matter.  I asked him is when they played Alcorn state and beat them 49-16 if they allowed them to have 12 men on the field and 5 downs to make a first since MSU has the bigger school/finances/recruiting draw.  He said it didn't matter...they were going to ring regardless.

    Fact is crowd noise is part of the game.....but artificial noise is not! 

    They should be fined and I'm sure that will force the needed change.

    http://www.respectthebell.com/background.php

    http://leadercall.com/opinion/x21033418/Miss-State-not-following-cowbell-etiquette
  • #160 by Rocky&Boarwinkle on 21 Nov 2010
  • I humbly agree with Rocky.
    And what is so funny, is that 99% who read this thread don't know why I am chuckling at this.  Good times.   ;D
  • #161 by Sue E NoNutts on 21 Nov 2010
  • Did anyone else hear a vuvuzela during last night's game?  I could have sworn I heard one a few times.
  • #162 by Rocky&Boarwinkle on 21 Nov 2010
  • Did anyone else hear a vuvuzela during last night's game?  I could have sworn I heard one a few times.
    You were not imagining it.
  • #163 by MrsHogInMo on 21 Nov 2010
  • #164 by JethroB. on 21 Nov 2010
  • I imagine Hocker and our deep snapper heard them....ban the damn cowbells!

    I agree.....i wish they'd have those bells direct deposited
  • #165 by Red40 on 21 Nov 2010
  • Yeah, their cowbell compromise is a bunch of crap. They rang those things on every 3rd down.  They even had an air-horn during our pass plays early in the game. Sorry, but i dont think this should be allowed because you cant have control over 50,000 people.  Ban'em.
  • #166 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • Wow.

    It is hard to believe that people can be at an event and have such WILDLY differing opinions of what happened.

    I have always been against the cowbells, but came away last night favoring them.

    I thought it was awesome the way they used the bells before the game, during stoppage of play, etc.

    And I paid a lot of attention to the issue and I can state unequivocally there were hardly any cowbells being used when we were at the line of scrimmage, during plays, etc. The video screen often said "use your bells responsibly" (which is pretty funny if you think about it) and I am positive that was the case. I just think those who say the bells were used at the wrong times, according to the compromise, are wrong.

    I loved the atmosphere at the game last night -- full house and a lot of excitement. Others have said we could use some tips from the Misstake folks on "excitement promotions" and I agree with them.

  • #167 by TexHog188 on 21 Nov 2010
  • Source:  http://www.mstateathletics.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=16800&ATCLID=926236

    The Cowbell
    The most unique and certainly the most resounding symbol of Mississippi State University tradition is the cowbell. Despite decades of attempts by opponents and authorities to banish it from scenes of competition, diehard State fans still celebrate Bulldog victories loudly and proudly with the distinctive sound of ringing cowbells.

    The precise origin of the cowbell as a fixture of Mississippi State sports tradition remains unclear to this day. The best records have cowbells gradually introduced to the MSU sports scene in the late 1930s and early 1940s, coinciding with the 'golden age' of Mississippi State football success
    prior to World War II.

    The most popular legend is that during a home football game between State and arch-rival Mississippi, a jersey cow wandered onto the playing field. Mississippi State soundly whipped the Rebels that Saturday, and State College students immediately adopted the cow as a good luck charm. Students are said to have continued bringing a cow to football games for a while, until the practice was eventually discontinued in favor of bringing just the cow's bell.

    Whatever the origin, it is certain that by the 1950s cowbells were common at Mississippi State games, and by the 1960s were established as the special symbol of Mississippi State. Ironically, the cowbell's popularity grew most rapidly during the long years when State football teams were rarely successful. Flaunting this anachronism from the 'aggie' days was a proud response by students and alumni to outsider scorn of the university's 'cow college' history.

    In the 1960s two MSU professors, Earl W. Terrell and Ralph L. Reeves obliged some students by welding handles on the bells to they could be rung with much more convenience and authority. By 1963 the demand for these long-handled cowbells could not be filled by home workshops alone, so at the suggestion of Reeves the Student Association bought bells in bulk and the Industrial Education Club agreed to weld on handles. In 1964 the MSU Bookstore began marketing these cowbells with a portion of the profits returning to these student organizations.

    Today many styles of cowbells are available on campus and around Starkville, with the top-of-the-line a heavy chrome-plated model with a full Bulldog figurine handle. But experts insist the best and loudest results are produced by a classic long-handled, bicycle-grip bell made of thinner and tightly-welded shells.

    Cowbells decorate offices and homes of Mississippi State alumni, and are passed down through generations of Bulldog fans. But they are not heard at Southeastern Conference gamesnot legally, at leastsince the 1974 adoption of a conference rule against 'artificial noisemakers' at football and basketball games. On a 9-1 vote SEC schools ruled cowbells a disruption and banned them.

    This has done little harm to the cowbell's popularity, however, or to prevent cowbells from being heard outside stadiums in which the Bulldogs are playing. They can still be heard at non-conference football contests, as well as other sporting events on campus. And bold Bulldog fans still risk confiscation for the privilege of keeping a unique Mississippi State tradition alive and ringing at SEC affairs

    It should also be noted that the tradition of bringing a cow to the game ended right about the time that tailgating became a bit tastier, ala... BBQ, burgers, ribs, steaks.  Coincidence?  I think not.
  • #168 by Ex-Trumpet on 21 Nov 2010
  • Why do officials not give a warning to the crowd?  Upon 2nd violation, make it an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty.
  • #169 by 31to6 on 21 Nov 2010
  • I was wondering what the rules were for them and looked this up.  Haven't watched more than 1st quarter due to having to be up at 3 Eastern time but it seemed they broke these rules all night long.

    --The cowbell compromise, a one-year rule allowing MSU fans to use their traditional noisemakers during stoppages of play (such as timeouts, after scores and at halftime). MSU was said to have broken that rule more than once this season, according the SEC and the future of the cowbell is in peril.--

    Obviously we got the win which is the only thing that matters but in you guys opinions did the cowbells come into play at all during the game? 
    They have to instruct the refs to throw flags. That is the only thing that will either get MSU to police the ban or their fans to respect the rule.

    I don't have a problem with the cowbells existing--it is part of their tradition. I have a problem with 30,000 cowbells ringing while the opposing offense is trying to call audibles.
  • #170 by snoblind on 21 Nov 2010
  • I did my best to start the cowbell and vuvuzela traditions at Fayetteville back in the mid-60's (I still have both BTW).  I was overruled by the PTB (being translated as my parents).  $@#&(^%?!  blue hairs   :)   
  • #171 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • I have a problem with 30,000 cowbells ringing while the opposing offense is trying to call audibles.

    Did not happen last night -- an occasional bell, but they almost unanimously followed the rules of the compromise.
  • #172 by 31to6 on 21 Nov 2010
  • Did not happen last night -- an occasional bell, but they almost unanimously followed the rules of the compromise.
    Fair enough. It is hard to tell on tv because they use technology to filter out most  of the crowd noise most of the time. Every shot of the fans I saw they were ringing them like madmen, but of course they only shoot the crowd when the ball is not in play.
  • #173 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • Fair enough. It is hard to tell on tv because they use technology to filter out most  of the crowd noise most of the time. Every shot of the fans I saw they were ringing them like madmen, but of course they only shoot the crowd when the ball is not in play.


    I was there and sitting right by a huge section of "cowbellers". They really did follow the rules, with only a few exceptions. And I actually saw State fans telling those few to stop when they did it. When we had the ball and were getting ready to run a play, they were yelling, but not ringing.

    I have to congratulate State on a great atmosphere for the game. Mullen is doing a great job and you can see the improvement of their team and their overall program.

  • #174 by BuschHawg on 21 Nov 2010
  • Cowbells are a decades old part of their football tradition. They are certainly annoying to the opponent, but I have no problem with them as long as they are used responsibly at the appropriate times. Any blame lies squarely on the shoulders of the SEC for not enforcing their rules. Just like reviewing a refs call, the visiting coach should be able to request a replay whereas they are listening for a bell violation. If they hear a single cowbell its an automatic penalty. Its simple. Let them have their cowbells, enforce the rules and lets simply find ourselves an equally annoying tradition.
  • #175 by fred ziffel on 21 Nov 2010
  • You could hear them on TV. Clear as a cowbell. While we had the ball.


    Did not happen last night -- an occasional bell, but they almost unanimously followed the rules of the compromise.
  • #176 by fred ziffel on 21 Nov 2010
  • My wife even noticed them while we had the ball. She doesn't pay attention to football at all. She said they sounded like locusts....I told her they were bad in Starkville this time of year...especially under the lights.
  • #177 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • You could hear them on TV. Clear as a cowbell. While we had the ball.



    Okay, I was there and sat right in the middle of Cowbell Section. So, the only conclusion possible is that I am lying.

  • #178 by GoodLuckGus on 21 Nov 2010
  • Okay, I was there and sat right in the middle of Cowbell Section. So, the only conclusion possible is that I am lying.

    Or just got used to them.  They were clearly heard on TV.  They were pretty good for most of the game, you could hear a few, but for the most part they followed the compromise.  But as the game got near the end more and more could be heard during times when they were not supposed to be using them.  During OT they were near full blast while Arkansas was on offense.  I have no idea how you could have missed that.
  • #179 by fred ziffel on 21 Nov 2010
  • Not saying you are lying. I am sure you couldn't hear them where you were sitting. Were you in the student section or old folks section?  The fans you were around were probably obeying the rules and drowning them out. But even the announcers on TV could hear them and mentioned the infraction a few times times. Go back and watch the replay. You can hear them several times when we have the ball. Not every time. But quite a few times. The locusts were buzzing.

    Okay, I was there and sat right in the middle of Cowbell Section. So, the only conclusion possible is that I am lying.


  • #180 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • Or just got used to them.  They were clearly heard on TV.  They were pretty good for most of the game, you could hear a few, but for the most part they followed the compromise.  But as the game got near the end more and more could be heard during times when they were not supposed to be using them.  During OT they were near full blast while Arkansas was on offense.  I have no idea how you could have missed that.

    Next time I will decide to stay home and watch it on television to get a more accurate assessment. Actually being at the game is a clear liability.

  • #181 by fred ziffel on 21 Nov 2010
  • Apparently, when it comes to hearing cowbells.....

    Next time I will decide to stay home and watch it on television to get a more accurate assessment. Actually being at the game is a clear liability.


  • #182 by GoodLuckGus on 21 Nov 2010
  • Next time I will decide to stay home and watch it on television to get a more accurate assessment. Actually being at the game is a clear liability.


    Clearly it didn't help.  Someone need to post a vid of us on offense during OT.  They were clear as could be.
  • #183 by Ex-Trumpet on 21 Nov 2010
  • Next time I will decide to stay home and watch it on television to get a more accurate assessment. Actually being at the game is a clear liability.



    Ya think it's a REMOTE possibility that there were cowbells somewhere else in the stadium besides where you sat?
  • #184 by hixonium on 21 Nov 2010
  • Arkansas played better with the cowbells.  Any doubt?  See final score.
  • #185 by Newhopehog on 21 Nov 2010
  • tv announcers commented on cowbells being rung during our offensive plays....perhaps some people had their hearing aids turned off......
  • #186 by New Pig In Town on 21 Nov 2010
  • I was there as well and I thought they did a pretty good job at obeying the rule.  They used them after a big play and some while we were in the huddle but as soon as we broke the hudde they stopped.  Of course there are a few that will still ring them but overall they used them when they were supposed to.
  • #187 by Michael Porkleone on 21 Nov 2010
  • #188 by ennairb on 21 Nov 2010
  • #189 by StraightHoggin19 on 21 Nov 2010
  • I was in the middle of MS State fans last night behind the Razorback bench. Those bells were being rung the entire time without any stopping during plays or during any of the required times. If the Hog call can't be lead during the game by the PA guy, then those bells shouldn't be allowed at all. Oh, and there we're vuvuzelas last night in the stands. They had them in front of me in addition to the cowbells!
  • #190 by ark30inf on 21 Nov 2010
  • Why do officials not give a warning to the crowd?  Upon 2nd violation, make it an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty.

    NCAA rules do not allow on-field penalty for crowd noisemakers I believe.  They can't throw a flag for that.
  • #191 by ennairb on 21 Nov 2010
  • It's Miss State... they have a trashy stadium in a trashy town. Do you really expect them to ahear to any sort of rules.
  • #192 by Root66 on 21 Nov 2010
  • a **** vuvuzela is the horn used during the 2010 world cup

    What is the world cup?
  • #193 by ark30inf on 21 Nov 2010
  • Just like reviewing a refs call, the visiting coach should be able to request a replay whereas they are listening for a bell violation. If they hear a single cowbell its an automatic penalty.

    I don't believe it is legal for the SEC to do this according the NCAA noisemaker rules.  I think they can assess a fine against the institution....but cannot lay out on-field penalties.
  • #194 by Root66 on 21 Nov 2010
  • Crowd noise, (human sounds, screaming, yelling, howling, whistling, farting, etc etc) used to draw a WARNING from the game officials to the opposing coaching staff who would signal to the P.A. announcer to advise the crowd to silence the noise when the visiting team was on offense, especially in the end zone area where college teams usually placed their student section. If they failed to do so, after a warning the game officials would throw a flag and step off five yards against the home team repeating as many times as needed. Air horns were especially taboo and were eventually outlawed altogether. You had one, you didn't get in. You sneaked one in, they sneaked you out of the stadium...physically.

    Of course there wasn't any "breaking the plane of the goal line" in those days either. You had to physically get into the endzone with your entire body either on your feet or diving over bodies with most of your own body landing in the end zone.

    This was college football at it's best.
  • #195 by Michael Porkleone on 21 Nov 2010
  • Crowd noise, (human sounds, screaming, yelling, howling, whistling, farting, etc etc) used to draw a WARNING from the game officials to the opposing coaching staff who would signal to the P.A. announcer to advise the crowd to silence the noise when the visiting team was on offense, especially in the end zone area where college teams usually placed their student section. If they failed to do so, after a warning the game officials would throw a flag and step off five yards against the home team repeating as many times as needed. Air horns were especially taboo and were eventually outlawed altogether. You had one, you didn't get in. You sneaked one in, they sneaked you out of the stadium...physically.

    Of course there wasn't any "breaking the plane of the goal line" in those days either. You had to physically get into the endzone with your entire body either on your feet or diving over bodies with most of your own body landing in the end zone.

    This was college football at it's best.

    They also used to play in leather helmets.

    I know it's hard to understand, but sometimes hings change for the better. 
  • #196 by 1highhog on 21 Nov 2010
  • Okay, I was there and sat right in the middle of Cowbell Section. So, the only conclusion possible is that I am lying.



    I'm not going to call you a lier, but I'm going to say that by the 4th quarter you wre evidently death.  They were ringing them so loud while the Hogs were on Offense, especially on key 3rd down plays it was hard to hear the grating voice of Chuck.  I also have the Game DVR'd, they qre ver loud, go back and listen when your ears get back to normal.  Also, Miss State fans started throwing those bells and also liquor bottles at people after the Game, so yeah, they have a great atmospere.
  • #197 by FayettevilleHog on 21 Nov 2010
  • I heard the vuvuzelas on tv also along with the cowbells. I guess MissStake fans thought if one illegal noisemaker is ok, why not add some variety.
  • #198 by Root66 on 21 Nov 2010
  • They also used to play in leather helmets.

    I know it's hard to understand, but sometimes hings change for the better.

    In this case it didn't. Get better that is. That's exactly where all you goofy juvenile punks think you got to be half soused and standing the entire game in order to be a "real fan".  You don't.
  • #199 by N HOG on 21 Nov 2010
  • The placement of microphones might me affecting people's judgement of the cowbells. In the stadium, the cowbells were drowned out by the yelling when Arkansas had the ball.

    I was on the field for the final five minutes of regulation and the OTs. I never noticed the cowbells when Arkansas had the ball when I was down there. I'm sure the players didn't notice them either.



    Thank you. Good observation.

    Obviously, it would be incorrect to say there wasn't a single cowbell ringing when we started a play, but it was clear it was not a factor. The overwhelming majority of MSU fans only used them when they were supposed to. That was my point.


    And, as I said earlier, I saw numerous MSU fans telling others not to ring them at inappropriate times.


  • #200 by SRFL on 21 Nov 2010
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